The Power of Barre Chords

Learning patterns of barre chords

Take your playing to the next level with your barre chords.

You may wonder how you can possibly memorize all chords in the chart when you are barely making it with the open chords. Good news! Barre chords will unlock the path taking you further on most chords of the chart.

We mentioned earlier that barre chords are moveable chords where you can move the whole shape of a chord up and down the fretboard hitting all other chords in the music alphabet.

Let’s find out how we can make use of the two open chords from our basic guitar chords list.

E-type & A-type Barre Chords

The most important barre chord shapes are the A-type barre chords and E-type barre chords. They are barre chord forms with A major and E major open chords. Originally, these basic chords are barre chords yet with the aid of the nut, fretting across the strings, you can now play both as an open chord. 

Forming a Barre Chord

Now, let’s put your index finger to use by fretting all six strings for E and five strings for A in a single fret before the nut. Then add either E and A open chords using fingers 2, 3 & 4 to see both chords in full barre chord shape. Move everything half step, barring the first fret beside the nut, for a better view or perspective of its form.

Remember the first finger exercise we shared on identifying the music alphabet when fretting notes per string with “Open Strings’ Name” (EADGBe) as your reference point. We will build on that exercise to form and identify your barre chords. You will be able to do all major chords in both forms, having the 6th or 5th string as the root of the barre chord.

E – Form Barre Chord

The E-type barre chord is an E chord shape barred up and down the frets where the root of the chord is on the sixth string. Moving your open chord half step forward plus barred 1st fret using your index finger will make an F Major.

E open string – move half step to F

F Major (F) Barre Chord

  • Place your 1st/index finger to bar across all strings of 1st fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/3rd fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 4th string/3rd fret

*Your index finger is actually fretting strings 6, 2 and 1 but you can fret all strings in between. The fretted 6th string on the first fret is the root note, F.

A – Form Barre Chord

The A-type barre chord is an A chord shape barred up and down the frets where the root of the chord is on the fifth string. Moving your open chord whole step forward plus barred 2nd fret, from 5th to 1st string, using your index finger will make a B Major.

A open string – move 2 frets to move one whole step to B

B Major (B) Barre Chord

  • Place your 1st/index finger to bar across 5th to 1st strings of 2nd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/4th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 3th string/4th fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 2nd string/4th fret
  • Do not play the 6th string, (X)

*Your index finger is actually fretting strings 5 & 1 but you can fret all strings in between. The fretted 5th string is the root note, B.

Major Barre Chords

With your E-shaped and A-shaped barre chords, you can now do all major chords including the sharps and flats of a note in your music alphabet.

Note:

  • Music Alphabet consists of letters from A to G only.
  • Move up and down the fretboard alphabetically with the open string names as your reference, E & A.
  • It usually takes a whole step to bar the notes except for two pairs in the music alphabet where you only move half step: B & C, E & F. 
  • In between whole steps are the sharp of the previous note or flat of the next note, both are the same.

These are the notes of the fretted sixth (E) and fifth string (A).

E-Shaped Barre Chord, Root on 6th String

E-open string || F | F#/G♭| G | G#/A♭| A |  A#/B♭| B | C | D | D#/E♭ | …

A-Shaped Barre Chord, Root on 5th String

A-open string || A#/B♭| B | C | D | D#/E♭| F#/G♭| G | G#/A♭| A | …

This is the power of barre chords, you hit everything else with two stones. We’ve prepared your index finger to practice fretting in a bar, now let’s add all other fingers to do the exercise below.

Unlocking Other Barre Chords

Let’s get started forming these shapes on the 5th fret. When strings 6 and 5 get fretted, you will get the following barre chords:

Fretted Root 6th String, E-type, 5th fret: A Major Chord (A)

  • Place your 1st/index finger to bar across all strings of 5th fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/6th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/7th fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 4th string/7th fret

Fretted Root 5th String, E-type, 5th fret: D Major Chord (D)

  • Place your 1st/index finger to bar across 5th to 1st strings of 5th fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/7th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 3th string/7th fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 2nd string/7th fret
  • Do not play the 6th string, (X)
E-type Barre Chords
  • Seventh or Dominant 7th: Lift your 4th finger.
  • Minor: Lift your 2nd finger.
  • Minor 7th: Lift your 2nd and 4th finger.
A-type Barre Chords
  • Seventh or Dominant 7th: Lift your 3rd finger.
  • Minor: Move your 4th finger half step backward. Change your finger position to comfortably fret the notes, it will look like an E open chord shape on strings 2, 3 and 4.
  • Minor 7th Barre Chord: From your minor barre chord, lift your 4th finger.
All About Patterns!

The power of barre chords is all about patterns you need to observe well and later on bank in your memory. A major chord is done differently when using a root note on the sixth string (E) and fifth string (A). You have to get a hold of both E-shaped barre chord and A-shaped barre chord to unlock other patterns. These variations are actually a change of note position or intervals (whole tone or semitone) affecting the pitch and frequency of a note within a chord. 

The terms and theory can really get technical if you want to further understand the core of these patterns but reserve it for another lesson to study. This time, I want you to get familiar with the patterns of these interval changes to play different chords.

Share Now

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on linkedin

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Post

Privacy PolicyAbout UsContact Us

© Copyright – Guitarist Academy